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Welcome to Julia C Bulette 1864!

Our chapter is located in Virginia City, Nevada. This site contains all the information on our events, officers, and assorted happenings. Come visit our meetings on the first Tuesday of each month at the Clamper Hall in Virginia City, just down the street from Piper's Opera House.

Julia’s Unequivocal Nevada Klampout #38, Wonder, NV

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 10-08-2017

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S L Y

Clamper year 6022

Brought to you by
Julia C. Bulette Chapter 1864, E Clampus Vitus

Envisioned by 
Noble Grand Humbug Reid Slayden

 Researched and interpreted by 
Jeffrey D. Johnson XNGH, Clamphistorian at Chapter 1864

Dedicated to
Rod Stock XSNGH, Jess Davis XNGH

2017 c.e.

Churchill County

Churchill County was established in 1861 and named after Fort Churchill (which is now in Lyon County), which was named after General Sylvester Churchill, a Mexican-American War hero who was Inspector General of the U.S. Army in 1861. Churchill County was not organized until 1864, and its county seats were Bucklands (1861–64) which is now in Lyon County, La Plata (1864–68), Stillwater (1868–1904) and Fallon (1904–present). In the 19th century there were several attempts to eliminate Churchill County because of its small population, but Assemblyman Lemuel Allen was able to stop it on all occasions including convincing the Governor to veto the bill after it had been passed by both houses in 1875.

William Morris Stewart – Nevada founding father

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 05-06-2017

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William Morris Stewart had a lengthy and remarkable career. Extraordinarily capable and articulate, he was the most visible of nineteenth century Nevada senators. He was a skilled politician. Never beloved, he was respected for his intelligence and mastery of detail, and feared for his often ruthless determination and occasional lack of scruples in attaining his desired ends. His interests focused on national as well as local issues, and he fit in quite comfortably with the venal culture of his times.

Read More: 

http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/william-stewart

Nevada Historical Society Quarterly

 

Then and Now, 1966

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 22-12-2016

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An ECV history pamphlet from 1966. h/t Jim Cirner

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ECV Historical Marker Database

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 04-05-2013

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Thanks to the good folks at The Historical Marker Database, we have a nice list of 785 ECV markers throughout the United States, including 28 markers attributed to chapter #1864. The database is searchable with a mapping function as well. Take a look through, and if you think one is missing, we’ll see about adding it.

There is also a mobile phone friendly website, which uses your location to show markers near you, and the Field Trip app from Google includes information from HMDB as well.

h/t Michael McClain

The Colorful History of the Nevada California State Boundary

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 05-04-2013

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NV_CA BoundaryThanks to Jeff Johnson. This is a great article.

“With the outbreak of the Civil War the mountain of silver under Virginia City became critical to national security. Nevada became a Territory by Act of Congress on March 2, 1861….

“It is interesting to note that longitude is not referenced to Greenwich, but to Washington, D.C….

“Nevada Territory’s land description set the stage for a minor civil war even though it acknowledged that the overlap would continue to belong to California until and unless she ceded it to Nevada Territory. These qualifying words did not stop Plumas County, California, and Roop County, Nevada Territory (now in Washoe County, Nevada) from exercising jurisdiction over the same ground in the vicinity of Honey Lake Valley. The powder keg exploded when the Roop County judge arrested the Plumas County justice of the peace. This outrage prompted the Plumas County sheriff to arrest the Roop County judge. Before long shots were fired and blood was shed. Fortunately, a truce was declared before things got completely out of hand and each side resolved to petition their governor for an equitable solution. Clearly it was time to put state line monuments on the ground.”

Read on…