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Welcome to Julia C Bulette 1864!

Our chapter is located in Virginia City, Nevada. This site contains all the information on our events, officers, and assorted happenings. Come visit our meetings on the first Tuesday of each month at the Clamper Hall in Virginia City, just down the street from Piper's Opera House.

6023 Candlelight Intitation

Posted by Metric | Posted in JCB 1864 Events | Posted on 07-03-2018


Julia’s Grave: History Or Myth?

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 07-03-2018

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Julia’s Grave: History Or Myth?

By Johnny Gunn

When one works toward enlarging an historical record, the word provenance is the key. What it means is proof. You say the such and such happened at this particular place at this particular time, and then you produce your source that cannot be questioned. Regarding Julia’s grave, too often over the years the sources provided must be questioned.

In the 1950s, Virginia City was emerging from a run-down, almost ghost town to a glamorous tourist mecca and one of the driving forces was Lucius Beebe, and New York raconteur with connections to major newspapers across the country, particularly San Francisco.

He bought property here including the defunct Territorial Enterprise and saw to it that every major newspaper and credible tourist writer in the country was on the mailing list, and he started a campaign to make Virginia City the “Livest Ghost Town” in the west, his description.

Legitimate history was enlarged, mythologized, and Julia C. Bulette played one of the major roles. Her history is grand by itself, it doesn’t need expansion, but that didn’t stop Beebe. His writing should never be used a provenance. It’s been discredited too often by too many legitimate historians.

Julia’s Unequivocal Nevada Klampout (JUNK) 6023

Posted by Metric | Posted in JCB 1864 Events | Posted on 07-03-2018


Julia’s Unequivocal Nevada Klampout (JUNK) 6023
Silver Peak, Nevada
August 17-18-19, 2018 CE

Preliminary Possible Planned Theory of the Potential Days of JUNK (details will change!)

Special invitation to all riders: This will be a motorcycle friendly event. We are inviting all riders to come in on their steeds, and we’ll try to arrange a pickup or two to carry your heavier gear so you can enjoy the ride and not skimp on your booze and victuals.



Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 07-03-2018


Presented by Gene “Dickhead” Duncker, PXP

In 1858, Abraham Curry bought Eagle Valley Station Ranch and names it Carson City. He began to lay-out the plans for development, setting aside a four acre plaza in the center for the anticipated State Capitol. It was pretty farsighted of him, considering we weren’t even a territory in our own right yet, still part of the Utah territory.
Six years later, we were granted statehood, and the fight was on for the determination of the location of our capital; Virginia City had the greatest population. Dayton claimed a convenient location on the Carson River. Genoa claimed to be the first white settlement. All this contention kept us in limbo until 1869. During this time, the Legislature met at the Hot Springs Hotel in Carson City, which happened to be owned by Abe Curry.

Philip Deidesheimer – Father of the Square Set — by Johnny Gunn

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 10-02-2018


As an organization dedicated to the preservation of mining history in the west, we couldn’t be in a better place. The history of Virginia City and the Comstock Lode could

Philip Deidesheimer

keep an historian busy writing for ten years or more. Mining engineers around the world are taught techniques that were developed here because of the complexity of the ore, the size of the lode itself, and the geology of the Virginia Range.

Demotion Dinner 6023

Posted by Metric | Posted in Uncategorized | Posted on 09-01-2018


Great Basin Alliance – 2018 schedule

Posted by Metric | Posted in Uncategorized | Posted on 29-11-2017


Great Basin Alliance Meeting
Las Plumas Del Oro Presiding
Mike Milton from LPDO 8
Jeremy Wilson SST
Don Asher JCB
Vic Mena JCB
Fed Ex – Chief Truckee
Slim Princess ABSENT
Gunny – Copper Queen
Tonguepunch – 1422
Glitch – 1422/LJS
Winnemucca Bill – Sam Clemens Outpost
Jan 13: SST Demotion Dinner
Jan 20: JCB Demotion Dinner

53rd Annual Nevada Day Ball

Posted by Metric | Posted in JCB 1864 Events | Posted on 11-10-2017


NV ball flier

Julia’s Unequivocal Nevada Klampout #38, Wonder, NV

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 10-08-2017



Clamper year 6022

Brought to you by
Julia C. Bulette Chapter 1864, E Clampus Vitus

Envisioned by 
Noble Grand Humbug Reid Slayden

 Researched and interpreted by 
Jeffrey D. Johnson XNGH, Clamphistorian at Chapter 1864

Dedicated to
Rod Stock XSNGH, Jess Davis XNGH

2017 c.e.

Churchill County

Churchill County was established in 1861 and named after Fort Churchill (which is now in Lyon County), which was named after General Sylvester Churchill, a Mexican-American War hero who was Inspector General of the U.S. Army in 1861. Churchill County was not organized until 1864, and its county seats were Bucklands (1861–64) which is now in Lyon County, La Plata (1864–68), Stillwater (1868–1904) and Fallon (1904–present). In the 19th century there were several attempts to eliminate Churchill County because of its small population, but Assemblyman Lemuel Allen was able to stop it on all occasions including convincing the Governor to veto the bill after it had been passed by both houses in 1875.

William Morris Stewart – Nevada founding father

Posted by Metric | Posted in History | Posted on 05-06-2017


William Morris Stewart had a lengthy and remarkable career. Extraordinarily capable and articulate, he was the most visible of nineteenth century Nevada senators. He was a skilled politician. Never beloved, he was respected for his intelligence and mastery of detail, and feared for his often ruthless determination and occasional lack of scruples in attaining his desired ends. His interests focused on national as well as local issues, and he fit in quite comfortably with the venal culture of his times.

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Nevada Historical Society Quarterly